Death, Dying, and Social Differences (BOK)

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Society has become increasingly diverse; multi-cultural, multi-faith and wide ranging in family structures. The wealthier are healthier and social inequalities are more pronounced. Respecting and working with the range of 'differences' among service users, families and communities in health and social care with ill, dying and bereaved people is a neglected area in the literature. As the principles of palliative and end of life care increasingly permeate the mainstream of health and social care services, it is important that professionals are sensitive and respond to the differing needs of individuals from diverse socio-economic backgrounds, ethnicities, beliefs, abilities and sexual orientations, as well as to the different contexts and social environments in which people live and die. This book explores what underpins inequality, disadvantage and injustice in access to good end of life care. Increasingly clinicians, policy planners, and academics are concerned about inequity in service provision. Internationally, there is an increasing focus and sense of urgency both on delivering good care in all settings regardless of diagnosis, and on better meeting the needs of vulnerable and disadvantaged groups. National initiatives emphasise the importance of resolving disparities in care and harnessing empowered user voices to drive change. This newly expanded, fully revised second edition, with 11 new chapters, provides a comprehensive analysis of discrimination, difference and disadvantage in end of life care, and offers practical guidance for all who seek to support the equitable provision of good end of life care.

Produktfakta

Språk Engelsk Engelsk Innbinding Heftet
Utgitt 2011 Forlag
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS ACADEM
ISBN 9780199599295 Antall sider 240
Dimensjoner 16,3cm x 22,9cm x 2,4cm Vekt 372 gram
Leverandør Bertram Trading Ltd Andre medvirkende Barbara Monroe, David Oliviere, Sheila Payne
Emner og form Health systems & services, Palliative medicine, Terminal care nursing, Sociology: death & dying, Medical sociology