The Capacity to Care: Gender and Ethical Subjectivity (BOK)

Wendy Hollway

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Wendy Hollway explores a subject that is largely absent from the topical literature on care. Humans are not born with a capacity to care, and this volume explores how this capacity is achieved through the experiences of primary care, gender development and later, parenting. In this book, the author addresses the assumption that the capacity to care is innate. She argues that key processes in the early development of babies and young children create the capability for individuals to care, with a focus on the role of intersubjective experience and parent-child relations. "The Capacity to Care" also explores the controversial belief that women are better at caring than men and questions whether this is likely to change with contemporary shifts in parenting and gender relations. Similarly, the sensitive domain of the quality of care and how to consider whether care has broken down are also debated, alongside a consideration of what constitutes a 'good enough' family. "The Capacity to Care" provides a unique theorization of the nature of selfhood, drawing on developmental and object relations psychoanalysis, as well as philosophical and feminist literatures. It will be of relevance to social scientists studying gender development, gender relations and the family as well as those interested in the ethics of care debate. Wendy Hollway is a Professor in Psychology at the Open University. She has worked in several social science disciplines and has pursued a critical psychology perspective in many areas. She is especially interested in the development of subjectivity and the use of psychoanalysis in qualitative methodology.

Produktfakta

Språk Engelsk Engelsk Innbinding Heftet
Utgitt 2006 Forfatter Wendy Hollway
Forlag
Taylor & Francis
ISBN 9780415399685
Antall sider 168 Dimensjoner 15,6cm x 23,4cm x 1,2cm
Vekt 270 gram Leverandør Bertram Trading Ltd
Emner og form Sociology: family & relationships, Psychology