America Lost And Found: The BBS Story - Criterion Collection (DVD - SONE 1)

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Like the rest of America, Hollywood was ripe for revolution in the late sixties. Cinema attendance was down; what had once worked seemed broken. Enter Bob Rafelson, Bert Schneider, and Steve Blauner, who knew that what Hollywood needed was new audiences—namely, young people—and that meant cultivating new talent and new ideas. Fueled by money made from their invention of the superstar TV pop group the Monkees, they set off on a film-industry journey that would lead them to form BBS Productions, a company that was also a community. The innovative films produced by this team between 1968 and 1972 are collected in this box set — works created within the studio system but lifted right out of the countercultural id.

Head (1968) - Dir. Bob Rafelson
Hey, hey, it’s the Monkees . . . being catapulted through one of American cinema’s most surreal sixties odysseys. The brainchild of Bob Rafelson, making his directorial debut; his producing partner and Monkees cocreator Bert Schneider; and Jack Nicholson, a coscreenwriter on the project, Head was the fanciful beginning and ignominious end of the TV-bred supergroup’s big-screen career. In it, Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork become trapped in a kaleidoscopic satire that’s movie homage, media send-up, concert movie, and antiwar cry all at once. A constantly looping, self-referential spoof that was ahead of its time, Head escaped commercial success on its release but has since been reclaimed as one of the great cult objects of its era.

Easy Rider (1969) - Dir. Dennis Hopper
As Billy and “Captain America,” Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda motored down the highway on their Harley Davidsons to the roaring strains of Steppenwolf’s “Born to Be Wild,” the definitive counterculture blockbuster was born. The former clean-cut teen star Hopper’s down-and-dirty directorial debut, Easy Rider heralded the arrival of a new voice in film, one positioned firmly, angrily against the mainstream. After Easy Rider — with its radical, New Wave–style editing, outsider-rock soundtrack, revelatory performance by a young Jack Nicholson, and explosive ending — the American road trip would never be the same.

Five Easy Pieces (1970) - Dir: Bob Rafelson Following Jack Nicholson’s breakout supporting turn in Easy Rider, director Bob Rafelson devised a powerful leading role for the new star in the searing character study Five Easy Pieces. Nicholson plays the now iconic cad Bobby Dupea, a shiftless thirtysomething oil rigger and former piano prodigy immune to any sense of romantic or familial responsibility, who returns to his childhood home to see his ailing, estranged father — his blue-collar girlfriend (Karen Black, like Nicholson nominated for an Oscar) in tow. Moving in its simplicity and gritty in its textures, Five Easy Pieces is a lasting example of early 1970s American alienation.

Drive, He Said (1970) - Dir. Jack Nicholson
Fresh off of his Five Easy Pieces success, Jack Nicholson mounted his enormously irreverent directorial debut. Based on the best-selling novel by Jeremy Larner, Drive, He Said, free-spirited and sobering by turns, is a sketch of the exploits of a disaffected college basketball player (William Tepper) and his increasingly radical roommate (Michael Margotta), as well as a feverishly shot and edited snapshot of the early seventies (some of it was filmed during an actual campus protest). Fueled by Vietnam-era anxieties and perched on the edge of utter insanity, Nicholson’s audacious comedy (also starring Bruce Dern and Karen Black) is a startling howl direct from the zeitgeist.

A Safe Place (1971) - Dir. Henry Jaglom
One of the discoveries of the groundbreaking production company BBS was director Henry Jaglom. The fiercely idiosyncratic filmmaker — who would go on to have a decades-spanning career making independently produced female character studies — was first revealed to the film world with A Safe Place. In this delicate, introspective drama, laced with fantasy elements, Tuesday Weld stars as a fragile young woman in New York, unable to reconcile her ambiguous past with her unmoored present; Orson Welles as an enchanting Central Park magician and Jack Nicholson as a mysterious ex-lover round out the cast.

The Last Picture Show (1971) - Dir. Peter Bogdanovich
The Last Picture Show is one of the key films of the American cinema renaissance of the seventies. Set during the early fifties, in the loneliest Texas nowheresville to ever dust up a movie screen, this aching portrait of a dying West, adapted from Larry McMurtry’s novel, focuses on the daily shuffles of three futureless teens—the enigmatic Sonny (Timothy Bottoms), the wayward jock Duane (Jeff Bridges), and the desperate-to-be-adored rich girl Jacy (Cybil Shepherd)—and the aging lost souls who bump up against them in the night like drifting tumbleweeds, including Cloris Leachman’s lonely housewife and Ben Johnson’s grizzled movie-house proprietor. Featuring evocative black-and-white imagery and profoundly felt performances, this hushed depiction of crumbling American values remains the pivotal film in the career of the invaluable director and film historian Peter Bogdanovich.

The King Of Marvin Gardens (1972) - Dir. Bob Rafelson
For his electrifying follow-up to the smash success of Five Easy Pieces, Bob Rafelson dug even deeper into the crushed dreams of wayward America. Jack Nicholson and Bruce Dern play estranged siblings David and Jason, the former a depressive late-night-radio talk show host, the latter an extroverted con man; when Jason drags his younger brother to a dreary Atlantic City and into a real-estate scam, events spiral into tragedy. The King of Marvin Gardens, also starring a brilliant Ellen Burstyn as Jason’s bitter aging beauty-queen squeeze, is one of the most devastating character studies of the seventies.

Bonusmateriale

  • <b>Head</b>
  • Audio commentary featuring Monkees Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • New video interview with director Bob Rafelson
  • New documentary about BBS, featuring critic David Thomson and historian Douglas Brinkley
  • <b>Easy Rider</b>
  • Audio commentary featuring director Dennis Hopper
  • Easy Rider: Shaking the Cage, a 1999 documentary featuring behind-the-scenes footage
  • Footage of Hopper and star Peter Fonda at Cannes in 1969
  • New video interview with BBS’s Steve Blauner
  • <b>Five Easy Pieces</b>
  • Audio commentary featuring director Bob Rafelson and interior designer Toby Rafelson
  • Soul Searching in Five Easy Pieces, a 2009 video piece in which Rafelson discusses the film
  • BBStory, a 2009 documentary
  • Excerpts from an audio recording of Rafelson at the American Film Institute in 1976
  • <b>Drive, He Said</B>
  • A Cautionary Tale of Campus Revolution and Sexual Freedom, a 2009 video piece in which director Jack Nicholson discusses the experience of making this film
  • <b>A Safe Place</b>
  • Audio commentary featuring director Henry Jaglom
  • Henry Jaglom Finds “A Safe Place,” a 2009 video piece in which the director discusses the film
  • Notes on the New York Film Festival, a 1971 video piece featuring an interview conducted by critic Molly Haskell with directors Peter Bogdanovich and Jaglom about their films The Last Picture Show and A Safe Place
  • Deleted scene and screen tests
  • <b>The Last Picture Show</b>
  • Two audio commentaries, one featuring director Peter Bogdanovich and the other featuring Bogdanovich and actors Cybill Shepherd, Randy Quaid, Cloris Leachman, and Frank Marshall
  • Picture This, a 1990 documentary by George Hickenlooper
  • “The Last Picture Show”: A Look Back, an hour-long 1999 documentary
  • 2009 interview with Bogdanovich
  • Screen tests and location footage
  • <b>The King of Marvin Gardens</b>
  • Selected-scene audio commentary featuring director Bob Rafelson
  • Reflections of a Philosopher King, a 2009 documentary about the making of the film
  • Afterthoughts, a short 2002 documentary about the film, produced by Rafelson

Produktfakta

Produksjonsår 1968 Format DVD
Sone Sone 1 Sjanger Drama
Antall disker 9 Spilletid 11 timer 31 minutter
Aldersgrense 15 Undertekster Engelsk
Lydformater Mono 1.0 (Engelsk), Stereo 2.0 (Engelsk) Bildeformater Fullscreen 4:3, Widescreen 16:9 Anamorphic
Regissør Diverse Regissører Skuespillere Bruce Dern, Cybill Shepherd, Dennis Hopper, Ellen Burstyn, Jack Nicholson, Jeff Bridges, Karen Black, Orson Welles, Peter Fonda, The Monkees, Timothy Bottoms
Bestillingsnummer CRRN1959DVD Leverandør Import

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